Women dating smaller men

27-Jun-2016 04:49

“It turned out,” Last wrote in The Weekly Standard, “that the marriage rate for these women was a greater influence on vote choice than any other variable.” All of this prompts the question of how marital status might affect women’s voting patterns in 2016.This would have been a critically important election for this constituency even without a Supreme Court seat potentially hanging in the balance, but the sudden death of Antonin Scalia puts an even finer point on it.The most radical of feminist ideas—the disestablishment of marriage — has been so widely embraced as to have become habit, drained of its political intent but ever-more potent insofar as it has refashioned the course of average female life.I am not arguing that singleness is in and of itself a better or more desirable state than coupledom.By the time I walked down the aisle — or rather, into a judge’s chambers — in 2010, at the age of 35, I had lived 14 independent, early-adult years that my mother had spent married.I had made friends and fallen out with friends, had moved in and out of apartments, had been hired, fired, promoted, and quit.

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Across classes, and races, we are seeing a wholesale revision of what female life might entail.

In 2012, unmarried women made up a remarkable 23 percent of the electorate.

Almost a quarter of votes in the last presidential election were cast by women without spouses, up three points from just four years earlier.

Many single women, across classes and races, would like to marry — or at least form loving, reciprocal, long-term partnerships, and many of them do, partnering or cohabiting without actually marrying.

Still, the rise of the single woman is an exciting turn of historical events because it entails a complete rethinking of who women are and what family is and who holds dominion within it — and outside it.

Across classes, and races, we are seeing a wholesale revision of what female life might entail.In 2012, unmarried women made up a remarkable 23 percent of the electorate.Almost a quarter of votes in the last presidential election were cast by women without spouses, up three points from just four years earlier.Many single women, across classes and races, would like to marry — or at least form loving, reciprocal, long-term partnerships, and many of them do, partnering or cohabiting without actually marrying.Still, the rise of the single woman is an exciting turn of historical events because it entails a complete rethinking of who women are and what family is and who holds dominion within it — and outside it.The practicalities of female life independent of marriage give rise to demands for pay equity, paid family leave, a higher minimum wage, universal pre-K, lowered college costs, more affordable health care, and broadly accessible reproductive rights; many of these are issues that have, for years, been considered too risky to be central to mainstream Democratic conversation, yet they are policies today supported by both Democratic candidates for president.